After over four years of working on this painting, it is finally complete! Unknowingly, I finished it during the fifth anniversary of Michael Jackson’s passing.

This is the story of the painting, “It’s All About the L.O.V.E.”

I never knew much about Michael Jackson. He remained in my periphery while he was alive. I was not a fan of his music, as I was not allowed to listen to anything but Christian tunes as a kid. Once I was a teen, I didn’t get into pop culture. I liked the alternative stuff. I didn’t pay much attention to him. His reputation didn’t seem good, with the trial and plastic surgery, and all the weird and negative media attention. I just kept my distance. The only music video I had ever seen of his, was Scream.

Anyways, soon after his passing MJ started showing up in my dreams, which was strange to me. He kept showing up, as a kid, an adult, and anywhere in between, just wanting to be friends… It’s as if we were. I didn’t understand it, as I never idolized him or payed him much attention. Strange synchronicities, or coincidental omens if you will, kept happening around him and his music, to the point where it was far too frequent and freaky.  I know most people will think I am crazy for telling this story, I’m just a bit psychic. Most people labeled as “crazy” are just able to hear and see things that others cannot, or discredit as being imaginary.

The November after his passing, he started appearing to me in my waking state… Haunting me. I’d never been contacted so much from the other side, other than a few times from my grandma and my friend Heidi… but MJ liked to hang out. At first I thought it was crazy, and I felt awkward and embarrassed about it, but then I just accepted what was happening, and enjoyed his visits. We helped each other a lot. He would give me friendly advice, and I would help him deal with grief, regret and other peoples projections (God, there was a lot of that) from the other side.  He regretted not being able to offer his final performance.  He feared he let all of his fans down.  Most of all, he grieved leaving his children.

He told me things that I never heard but later confirmed through research. He taught me about haters and false accusations, saying, “People are gonna say what they’re going to say. There’s nothing you can do about it.  Especially when you get more into the limelight, people will talk. What’s most important is your integrity. That’s the key. As long as you are in integrity with yourself, that’s all you need to worry about.” I had no idea at the time , how much those words would help me later on, through some seriously heavy times around slanderous people.

He would show up suddenly, always welcome, and tell me about the joys or struggles he was facing in the afterlife.  The visits were frequent for a few months, then slowly began to dissipate. At one point, in the following year, it had been weeks since I had heard from him; I was in my friend’s bathroom, when he showed up.  He was radiant, like a child, frolicking in the gardens of wonder with other young spirits. He said, grinning like the sun, “Look!  I made it!”  I smiled and congratulated him, then he ran off once more, in joy and laughter. I didn’t hear from him for a very, very long time afterwards.

I always wondered why he would want to come visit someone like me, who had absolutely no interest in him while he was alive.  Apparently, he felt comfortable hanging with me because I had no preconceptions of who he was/is. I was like a blank slate with no expectations of him.

I did begin to watch his videos and listen to his music. I then read his autobiography. I was amazed to say the least. I became a fan.

So, yeah, that November I got the hit that I needed to do a painting of him. I started with one layer of blue. I put him into the canvas, let it dry, then painted an entire layer of blue paint on top of it. I asked him if he wanted to collaborate, then splashed some turpentine on the wet paint and left the room. “Go at it.”, I said. When I came back, there were some crazy patterns in the paint… I didn’t like all of it at first, especially the lightning drips out the back of his neck. I wanted to change it, but I refrained and reminded myself, “It’s a collaboration.”.  I knew the story would unfold, if I was patient and open. Sure enough, it did.

My favorite part if this piece was realizing that all the funny looking tiny turpentine drips were flames, lighter flames of his fans all over the world. I also dreaded that part cuz I knew it would be incredibly tedious. It’s as if the story tells us of a soul entering the world, creating such a massive impact in this incarnation, that the entire world, humanity as well as the Earth itself, are showing their appreciation in an eternal encore.

This has been such a profound and beautiful journey.  Obviously, I have left out the details, which are many, but perhaps you can get a sense of the incredible nature of how this painting came to be.  While for me, this is a tribute to Michael Jackson, for him, it is a tribute to his fans.

He still shows up in my dreams from time to time, maybe three or four times a year.  It’s rare, but it always feels like a good friend has come to visit.

And, as I laid the paintbrush down, after the last stroke of pigment left the canvas, “Will You be There” played on my ipod.. randomly.. out of thousands of songs.  Of course it did.

:::

All-About-the-L.O.V.E.-a-tribute-to-Michael-Jackson-by-Ka-Amorastreya

Eternal Encore : A Visionary Tribute to Michael Jackson

$45.00$400.00

Archival prints of Eternal Encore, on canvas and paper, signed by the artist:  Please choose from options below.

Canvas prints are limited, Edition of 350, hand-signed, numbered and varnished.  Limited Edition Prints are sold in descending order; prices increase as fewer remain in the edition.

Allow 2 -3 weeks for canvas orders.

  • 9×14″ archival paper print – $45
  • 18×28″ rolled (un-stretched) canvas – $350
  • 18×28″ stretched canvas – $400
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